fun stuffs!

21 Oct 14
1,833 notes Reblog Comments
rhodochrome:

lolololori:

(via When She Tweeted About Her Favorite Show, The Executive Producer’s Response Wasn’t What She Expected)
SHONDAAAAAAA

Absolutely love Shonda Rhimes—and the person she is responding to is homophobic—but as a bisexual person, I disagree with this. There ARE “gay scenes,” and they stick out because there are so few of them on TV. We (queer people) aren’t “just people too.” No. Queer people are not the same as straight people, and queer scenes on TV are not the same as straight scenes on TV. Visibility is important, and it’s necessary to recognize and highlight those directors/writers/executive producers (like Shonda Rhimes) who are helping make LGBTQ more visible. Erasing the difference between scenes with hetero sex & romance and scenes with queer sex & romance downplays the importance of depicting queer sex & romance. If we’re all just “people,” why even bother representing gay people at all?

This is a really good point and one I hadn’t thought of before posting. I think Shonda’s follow up responses do a good job of clarifying that there’s nothing wrong with gay scenes but “they’re just people, not gay people” is definitely a form of erasure, similar to, “I don’t see color”, no matter how well intentioned. Thanks to all who chimed in and brought this to my attention. The learnings never cease! ps. the original Upworthy post has been edited to reflect this info ;) 

rhodochrome:

lolololori:

(via When She Tweeted About Her Favorite Show, The Executive Producer’s Response Wasn’t What She Expected)

SHONDAAAAAAA

Absolutely love Shonda Rhimes—and the person she is responding to is homophobic—but as a bisexual person, I disagree with this. There ARE “gay scenes,” and they stick out because there are so few of them on TV. We (queer people) aren’t “just people too.” No. Queer people are not the same as straight people, and queer scenes on TV are not the same as straight scenes on TV. Visibility is important, and it’s necessary to recognize and highlight those directors/writers/executive producers (like Shonda Rhimes) who are helping make LGBTQ more visible. Erasing the difference between scenes with hetero sex & romance and scenes with queer sex & romance downplays the importance of depicting queer sex & romance. If we’re all just “people,” why even bother representing gay people at all?

This is a really good point and one I hadn’t thought of before posting. I think Shonda’s follow up responses do a good job of clarifying that there’s nothing wrong with gay scenes but “they’re just people, not gay people” is definitely a form of erasure, similar to, “I don’t see color”, no matter how well intentioned. Thanks to all who chimed in and brought this to my attention. The learnings never cease! 

ps. the original Upworthy post has been edited to reflect this info ;) 

Reblogged from rhodochrome
9 Oct 14

Please Don’t Send Me Shitty YouTube Content

294 notes Reblog Comments

I realize this is my own fault, but I’m tired. I really can’t call out every single person or channel that’s making problematic content on YouTube. It’s exhausting and opens me up to an endless stream of harassment that’s now spilling over into my personal and professional life. This stuff is draining and often extremely triggering.  I’m happy to uplift the voices of other people doing good work on YouTube, but please don’t send me people’s terrible videos and ask me to weigh in. Thanks for understanding. 

7 Oct 14
256 notes Reblog Comments
I agree racism is bad. To me it feels like you're throwing people under the bus and not looking at it from their view. They apologized and called the attention to their fans that certain things cross a line we should watch what we do. What you not happy with that? What makes you so perfect? What makes it ok for you to decide if his apology was good for others? What gives you that right? Or any of those who are bothered? You have a voice and others follow YOUR opinion. same as those u attackmmw24

I’m not going to repeat myself. I very clearly said in my video what I took issue with in that “apology”. I also said that I’m not negating anyone’s ability to better themselves and that an apology is the first step, the next step is a commitment to changing the behavior. A follow up video that says “fuck the haters I’m still doing rape jokes and racist jokes” is not a commitment to change. I also don’t understand why I’m still getting DOZENS of daily messages about this, WEEKS after the fact? What gives me the right to not accept a luke warm, insincere, self serving apology? What gives you the right to tell me I don’t have the right to not accept his apology? Do you see how exhausting and circular that is? And let’s be real here, acknowledging someone’s problematic content is not “throwing people under the bus”.

And on the contrary, I’ve never said  that I’m perfect. I’ve taken responsibility  for problematic  things I’ve said and done NUMEROUS TIMES. That’s part of being an adult and growing up. Having a temper tantrum is not. Plain and simple, criticism is not “attack” and no amount of pleading messages, racial slurs or messages to my friends/family/employer are going to change that. It’s unfortunate that you’re more concerned with how your favorite internet celeb is perceived by some stranger on Tumblr who has a measly few thousand followers, rather than addressing the harmful ideals he’s sharing with millions of children. If you truly believe in and enjoy the work that person is producing, the opinions of “haters” wouldn’t matter to you. But as they say, a hit dog will holler. 

6 Oct 14
390 notes Reblog Comments
I used to think you were like super cool and awesome and a great all around humble person, but lately you've been so negative and hateful constantly, I find it hard to think of you the same. I completely understand why though, it just sucks that it's all I hear from you now.bc-jessie

Hm. 

I get a ton of messages via my various social media platforms from people who’ve watched my content for years and consider me a “friend in their head”, which is super flattering. I really pride myself on staying connected to my audience and hate the idea of calling people “fans” because the last thing I want is for anyone to think I’m better or above them. I’m very fortunate to have had a lengthy career on YouTube which has opened lots of doors for me and connected me with amazing people around the world. But because online creators are so easily accessible through social media, I think it’s easy for people to forget that they don’t actually know the people behind the content. 

What you see of me online is just a sliver of my personality and what I’m interested in. But make no mistake, I’m just as real in person as I am online. (I mention that only because that hasn’t always been my experience when meeting vloggers and celebrities.) But there are lots of aspects of my life that I don’t reveal online, many of which are an important part of who I am as a person. It’s unfortunate that your opinion of me has changed over time, but to me that just confirms that you don’t really know me. Which is why I’m ok with it. Here’s the thing, I think it’s possible to acknowledge that I think I’m awesome and also be humble at the same time. I thank my audience every day, I answer tons of emails and messages from people asking for advice, I remind people that I’m flawed and imperfect and still manage to create and share content that I’m passionate about. It’s true, my content has changed over time, but I’m the same person I’ve always been, albeit more conscious and passionate about the world around me. I don’t see anything “hateful” or “negative” about fighting for equality for others, but you’re certainly entitled to your opinion. 

At the end of the day, I am very proud of the woman I am today. And I’m grateful for the amazing people who’ve helped me get to where I am. That doesn’t mean there isn’t room for improvement, but I’m very secure in who I am, which has taken a looong time to get to. But a big part of my personal journey has been realizing and accepting that not everyone is going to like me and that’s ok. If you’re unhappy with the content I produce or share, I promise I won’t take it personally if you choose to stop following along. Everything is not for everyone, including little ole’ me. Best of luck. 

3 Oct 14
377 notes Reblog Comments
Do you have any advice for moderately successful youtubers?shantrinas
  1. Be honest. If you screw up, admit it. If a video sucks, learn from it and move on. If you do a sponsored video, disclose. 

  2. Find your niche. It’s cool if you have a lot of talents, but what are you best at? What can you say or do that others can’t? What’s missing from the YouTube space that you can provide?

  3. Learn from your peers. What are other channels doing right and what are they doing wrong?

  4. Stick to a schedule. This is where I’ve always been a big bag of fail, but if you stick to an upload schedule, it’ll help grow your channel in the long run.

  5. Listen to your audience. Good feedback and bad. Mean comments suck, but sometimes there’s a grain of truth in there. A bunch of people took shots at my eyebrows for years and I was really pissed about it. Turns out I was wearing the wrong color pencil and now they look way better. 

  6. Collaborate with other YouTubers. But be realistic. Beyonce’s not gonna collab with Taylor Swift and Taylor Swift isn’t gonna work with a nobody indie singer. Reach out to channels with similar content, numbers and audience. Bring an idea to the table and make it worth it for them. 

  7. Don’t expect anything and you’ll never be disappointed and always be surprised. The video you just KNOW is going to go viral, probably won’t. The one you care least about and put no effort into will probably be the one to blow up. I dunno why, it just always seems to work out that way. 

  8. Reach out to press. Don’t tweet them, that’s annoying. Don’t mass email. That’s annoying. Don’t send every single video you post. That’s annoying. Don’t add people to your email list without permission. That’s annoying. Check your favorite blogs for a contact/tips email and send a personalized message that’s tailored to that specific outlet based on your video and what they cover. Only send the best of your best. 

  9. Use trends and topical stories for content. This doesn’t mean jump on every story or challenge because it’s popular. But if there’s a story that everyone’s talking about and you have a unique perspective that hasn’t been done before, do it up. Then go back to #8 and hope someone picks it up.

  10. Do it cause you love it. A lot of talented people fall into oblivion on YouTube and a lot of crappy people who make shit content make lots of money and get movie deals. Everyone can’t get rich and famous. Make content because you’re passionate and have something to say. If it’s meant to be a launch pad for your career, it will be. If not, that’s totally ok too. 

  11. Surround yourself with talented people and don’t be stingy with your knowledge/talent/success. It may feel like a competition, but I promise you it’s not. Your success is not contingent on someone else’s failure. Support and help your peers whenever you can. Shout them out, brainstorm ideas, hold a light, share their videos, go to their shows. Not because you’re looking for a handout later on, but because it’s the right thing to do. When your friends succeed, you succeed too.

    Best of luck <3 
1 Oct 14
574 notes Reblog Comments

mach712:

chescaleigh:

Re: Male Feminists and #HeForShe

mach712
:

Isn’t the entire point of the privileged speaking about oppression that the other privileged people are more likely to listen to them.

When did we stop wanting this?

Yes, privileged people are often times more likely to listen to someone else speaking about oppression if they look like them and have the same privileges. This somehow gives their opinions more “credibility”, which essentially means, “I don’t value the opinions or rights of people I see as less than me”.  That doesn’t make it any less annoying. And no, this is not something we want. I don’t want you to respect my humanity just because someone else you think has more credibility than I do told you to. And that also doesn’t mean that privileged person deserve cookies and praise for essentially saying the same thing that oppressed people have been saying for centuries. I’m lookin’ at you Tim Wise…

It’s great when allies speak up and support marginalized people to encourage equality. But it’s important to speak up, not over. Uplift the voices of the people you aim to support so that other privileged people can hear them. It’s not about you. Too many “allies” forget this. And I think that’s the big issue with the #HeForShe campaign and people like Tim Wise. Don’t be Macklemore and hog the mic. Take the mic because you can, and then pass it to someone who’s more qualified to speak. 

It’s not speaking over tho. No one is taking up any pre existing space. Emma Watson created a thing of her own to go along with everything else. I know you said you don’t want something like that. But what she’s trying to do is pretty similar to what you try to do on youtube in regards to racism. Getting the privileged groups to speak out because you know as many people wont listen to you.

I mean, to be honest. I’m not expecting much to come from heforshe. Just because I know these famous men aren’t going to keep it going longer than a quick fad. If it did stink around it wouldn’t end with men speaking. That’s just start people off.

As far as cookies. If I see someone speaking out about something I’m fine with a ‘cool glad to see you talking about this.’

Also, I totally get the mic thing. But Macklemore rereleasing Same Love to get it out to more people is more likely than not, the only reason Mary Lambert got popular or ever would have. (You know, cause music business is near impossible to make it in.) That’s pretty uplifting.

I can’t comment specifically on who is or isn’t speaking over others in the case of men coming out as feminists. I’m just co-signing what marinashutup said with regards to the dangers of feminist spaces being dominated by men and your question about privileged people speaking up for oppressed people. I didn’t say I don’t want the space that Emma has created. What I don’t want is (for example) a white person to listen just because another white person said they should because they devalue my opinion because I’m black. Great, they learned the message, but at the end of the day, they haven’t acknowledged the fact that their racism got in the way of them hearing it in the first place.

There’s nothing wrong with saying thank you to allies. But there’s a difference between saying thank you, and allies looking for praise rather than just doing the work because it’s the right thing to do. Hence, why I called out Tim Wise, who’s numerous times said that people of color should be more grateful because without him our concerns wouldn’t be heard. (I also included a link for reference) That’s shitty. Do the right thing cause it’s the right thing. Not because you want credit for doing the right thing. Big difference. 

Yes, it’s great that Macklemore made “Same Love”. But I was bothered by how the song felt like, “People thought I was gay, though there’s nothing wrong with being gay, but I’m not gay, no really, I’m not, but there’s nothing wrong with being gay”. And then, when Macklemore received a VMA for Same Love, he spent his speech patting himself on the back and didn’t let Mary Lambert (who’s lesbian) say much of anything. So yeah, pass the mic.

Reblogged from mach712