fun stuffs!

14 Sep 14
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Do you have any advice for a recent college grad who has a degree in graphic design? where are the best places to look for an entry level job?foxaveclocs

- If you haven’t already, make sure you have an online portfolio. If you don’t have the web skills, you can go really simple and just buy a $10 domain and set up a tumblr with your work on it. Don’t stress yourself out over having a “perfect” site. As long as it’s easy to get to and navigate, you’re fine. Less is more. 

- Create some cute business cards (with your portfolio link on there) and start handing them out! I use overnightprints.com for all my promotional stuff. They’re affordable, have fast turn around and great quality. Think of every outing as a chance to pick up a freelance client or get a job. As they say, it’s not what you know, but who you know. 

- Go to as many professional networking events as possible to meet people and get job leads. Some places to look for networking events: your local chamber of commerce, meetup.com, local POC groups, local LGBT groups, small business associations and women’s groups. Hit up Google with your city and the type of networking group you’re looking for. Once you go to one event, you’ll meet people who can suggest other groups worth checking out. Some have membership fees, but most will let you go to one or two events before joining or by paying a small entry fee.

- If you can afford it, join your local AIGA (American Institute Of Graphic Arts) to meet other designers, take classes, go to events and get job leads. I think the basic year membership is $50. They also have free non-member events, so check for those too. 

- Don’t under estimate the power of freelance! You can always take on a few clients while you’re looking for full time work. Put together a rate sheet that covers what type of work you can do (print, web, flyers, brochures etc) and how much you charge for each service. Make sure to always have a written contract with clients and ask for 50% up front and the remaining 50% once the project is complete. 

- Don’t work for free! Not even for friends and family. Your time and talent is valuable. Don’t give it away!

- Get the most recent edition of the Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook Of Pricing And Ethical Guidelines so you have an idea of how to price your work AND get access to tons of free contract outlines to use with clients. Seriously, this book is everything. 

Here are some sites I’ve used to find graphic design work - 
http://creativehotlist.com - I think it’s around $35 for an account, but I know lots of people who’ve found work here, myself included. 
http://designjobs.aiga.org - you need a membership to see all the listings
http://creativecircle.com - this is a creative staffing agency, so they place people on jobs that can last anywhere from a few days, few weeks, months to full time. They send out tons of personalized daily job listings so there’s lots of opportunities to work if you’re willing to apply to as much as possible.

That’s pretty much it! Best of luck! 
12 Sep 14
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My appearance today on “HuffPost Live #WMN: Tackling This Week’s Biggest Stories About Women”
This week’s biggest stories included Ray Rice, #WhyIStayed and for a bit of levity, Tampon Run. I’ve only done a small handful of live appearances, but I think this was one of my better, but more challenging ones. It was only 30 minutes, but I swear it felt like 10. We packed in A LOT in those 10 minutes, including 2 mini interviews. Once we got rolling I realized I was over prepared, which isn’t a bad thing, but in my head I had a bunch of talking points that probably should’ve been more boiled down into 3 or 4 instead of 10. 
The whole thing felt so fast and on top of that we were dealing with some heavy subjects which require a certain amount of nuance, which takes a lot of of you emotionally. This was glaringly obvious when my co-panelist somehow started sympathizing with Ray Rice (“He’s a really nice guy!”) and then got defensive when the other guest, a domestic violence survivor, called her out on victim blaming. Yeah. And I had to follow up after that. It was challenging but I got through it and I think I added to the conversation in a positive way, so overall I’m really happy. Thanks to everyone that tuned in! Ok, enough “behind the HuffPost Live”.  If you missed it, you can watch the episode here! 

My appearance today on “HuffPost Live #WMN: Tackling This Week’s Biggest Stories About Women”

This week’s biggest stories included Ray Rice, #WhyIStayed and for a bit of levity, Tampon Run. I’ve only done a small handful of live appearances, but I think this was one of my better, but more challenging ones. It was only 30 minutes, but I swear it felt like 10. We packed in A LOT in those 10 minutes, including 2 mini interviews. Once we got rolling I realized I was over prepared, which isn’t a bad thing, but in my head I had a bunch of talking points that probably should’ve been more boiled down into 3 or 4 instead of 10.

The whole thing felt so fast and on top of that we were dealing with some heavy subjects which require a certain amount of nuance, which takes a lot of of you emotionally. This was glaringly obvious when my co-panelist somehow started sympathizing with Ray Rice (“He’s a really nice guy!”) and then got defensive when the other guest, a domestic violence survivor, called her out on victim blaming. Yeah. And I had to follow up after that. It was challenging but I got through it and I think I added to the conversation in a positive way, so overall I’m really happy. Thanks to everyone that tuned in! 

Ok, enough “behind the HuffPost Live”.
  If you missed it, you can watch the episode here! 

11 Sep 14
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The 4 Terrifying Dating Secrets Abusers Are Counting On You Not Knowing

lyrasol:

The 4 Terrifying Dating Secrets Abusers Are Counting On You Not Knowing (via Upworthy)

Before we jump to conclusions about what someone should or shouldn’t do if they’re in a violent relationship, it’s important to first understand how abusers trap their partners into a cycle of abuse. I thought I knew where this GIF set was going, but the last one completely blindsided me.

So, Upworthy is kind of terrible and I really hate giving them my traffic, but I think it’s worth pointing out that not all perpetrators of domestic abuse are specifically going out with evil schemes trying to get people to abuse. In fact, I would guess that most aren’t. There are a lot of kinds of abuse that aren’t even intentional, but are still toxic and dangerous, and frankly, making it seem like all abusers are cartoon villains makes it harder for people to actually recognize the legitimacy and danger of less obvious forms of abuse.

Intentional or not, that doesn’t change the stages of physically abusive relationships or make the info shared in this post untrue. Please keep in mind I’m sharing content (I wrote this for Upworthy, hay) that’s intended to reach people who’ve never been exposed to these issues before. So that requires boiling things down to little bites so they’re easily digested. Point blank, someone like yourself is way more knowledgeable and doesn’t need this info. Think of this post as “intro to domestic violence” whereas you’re talking “DV 201”.

Abusive relationships are extremely complex and of course can’t be boiled down to 4 GIFs, but if I can get one person to understand how MANY abusive relationships work and how difficult it is for victims to leave so they’ll be more compassionate? I’ve done my job. If I can get one person to recognize these things in their own relationship and convince them to get help? I’ve done my job. No, this doesn’t cover every type of abusive relationship, but it’s a start. Remember this is an “intro course”.

The first thing I ask myself when looking for content to post on Upworthy is, “if a million people saw this, would it make the world a better place?” The headline might piss you off, but in this case and every post I’ve made before it, I believe the answer is yes.

Reblogged from lyrasol
10 Sep 14
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The 4 Terrifying Dating Secrets Abusers Are Counting On You Not Knowing

The 4 Terrifying Dating Secrets Abusers Are Counting On You Not Knowing (via Upworthy)

Before we jump to conclusions about what someone should or shouldn’t do if they’re in a violent relationship, it’s important to first understand how abusers trap their partners into a cycle of abuse. I thought I knew where this GIF set was going, but the last one completely blindsided me.

7 Sep 14
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Please don’t misunderstand me, my disliking something/someone is not a negative reflection on you. I’m just someone with an internet presence, not an authority on anything. I’m not here to police your thoughts, feelings  or the content you consume or enjoy.